Weekly Learning Download: Parashas Vayakhel

Every week, the Official ArtScroll Blog features a free learning download to enhance your shabbos and your learning.

This week’s free learning download is excerpted from Torah for Your Table, by Rabbi Yisroel Jungreis and Rabbi Osher Anshel Jungreis with Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis. This warm volume centers around the Shabbos table and invites the exchange of ideas and discussion.

Whether you are a newcomer to Torah thought or have dedicated many years to its study, Torah for Your Table will enhance the flavor of your every meal.

Make sure to visit the blog every Thursday for the week’s free learning download!

Click here to view or print the FREE Weekly Torah Download -Parashas Vayakhel

Click here for book details and exclusive online savings.

Click here to additional titles by Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis.

Crafting Jewish: Shalach Manot Hamantaschen

Thinking about Shalach Manot? Make these adorable fill-able hamantaschen for a fun and affordable packaging option!

Crafting Jewish by Rivky Koenig helps you prepare for the holidays with creative and inventive crafts geared at enhancing your celebration and giving kids – and adults! – a great time.

To help get you ready for Purim, we are sharing one of the Purim crafts in this book. These adorable hamantaschen are perfect for filling with candy and other treats. Some of the other purim crafts in Crafting Jewish include purim puppets, grand graggers, and lots of DIY costumes, masks and hats.

Hamantaschen Craft  The Official ArtScroll BlogShalach Manot Hamantaschen

What You Need:

dinner plate

1 (12″x18″) sheet of beige or brown craft foam

pencil

scissors

hamentashen, food, or candy

stapler

purple tissue paper or cellophane paper

6″-7″ plate, optional

How to do it:

1.  Place the plate on the craft foam and trace around the plate.

2.  Cut out the circle of craft foam. Place the hamantashen, food, or candy into the center of the circle.

3.  To make the hamantash’s triangular shape, lift up two sides of the circle and staple together on top, where the two sides meet. Lift up the remaining side and staple to each of the other sides (see photo).

4.  Cut out a square of tissue paper or cellophane slightly larger than the hamantash’s opening. Stuff the tissue paper or cellophane into the opening to cover the food.

Optional: Use a 6″-7″ plate as your template to make a smaller hamantash (see photo).

Estimated time: 10 minutes

Click here for exclusive online savings on Crafting Jewish.

Excerpted from Crafting Jewish by Rivky Koenig. Copyright ArtScroll/Mesorah Publications.

ArtScroll’s “French Revolution” continues! The Edmond J. Safra French Edition Talmud

The Schottenstein Edition Talmud Bavli sparked an ongoing revolution in the Jewish world, opening the Talmud’s vast wisdom to hundreds of thousands. The Schottenstein Edition Hebrew Talmud continued bringing ArtScroll’s innovative features to tens of thousands more.

And then, about a decade ago, it was the turn for French speakers to rejoice, as the first volume of the Edmond J. Safra French Edition Talmud was published. In France, Switzerland, Belgium, Israel, and Canada, French speakers could now enjoy the many features of the Schottenstein Edition, beautifully adapted into French by a team of scholars, translators, and editors.

Just released is the 19th volume of the series, Maseches Chagigah, dedicated by Mrs. Safra in memory of her son, daughter-in-law, and grandson. Maseches Sukkah, volume 2, will be released soon after Pesach, and more volumes are in the works.

Can you “parlez-vous francais?” Then you, too, can discover the wisdom of the Talmud.

Click here for the entire series (to date) of the Edmund J. Safra Edition French Talmud.

Click here for all French titles from ArtScroll.

Announcing: New Pesach Cookbook!

Pesach might seem like it’s way off in the distance, but here at ArtScroll we’re already getting ready for Pesach with a brand new, soon to be released cookbook!

Introducing: A Taste of Pesach: Trusted Favorites. Simple Preparation. Magnificent Results. 

Taste of Pesach_dust jacket-2.indd

A Taste of Pesach is compiled from the wildly popular mailings to benefit Yeshiva Me’on Hatorah and features over 160 recipes (many of which have never been published before!), each with a beautiful, full color image. Best of all, over 140 of the recipes are gluten and gebrokts free!

Make sure to subscribe to the blog (you can sign up for email on the right sidebar) to get future updates – including free sample recipes from this book!

A Taste of Pesach is scheduled for release on March 3rd.

Click here to pre-order your copy with exclusive online savings.

Humble Beginnings and Lofty Legacies: A Talk with Rabbi Paysach Krohn

ArtScroll talks with internationally acclaimed speaker and best-selling author, Rabbi Paysach Krohn about the start of his illustrious career, the legacy he carries, and the family traditions he’s passing on.

They say that behind every great man is a woman, and that adage is true in the case of Rabbi Paysach Krohn –  his illustrious writing career started with his mother. “My mother was a marvelous writer. As I was growing up we used to sit together and read well-written newspaper articles, editorials, and op-ed pieces, all so I would learn to express myself with concise clarity.”

And thus began Rabbi Krohn’s lifetime of writing.

Before he was a bestselling author of the popular Maggid Series of books, Rabbi Krohn wrote for periodicals such as The Jewish Observer and Olomeinu. “In 1976, ArtScroll published its first book and I was so impressed with the quality of the work and the writing. I decided that I wanted to write for ArtScroll.”

“I called Rabbi Meir Zlotowitz and asked about publishing with ArtScroll. At first, we discussed a book on Mishlei, but I realized that would be a major undertaking.” Shortly thereafter, ArtScroll began to publish books on various topics, in addition to Tanach commentaries, so Rabbi Krohn’s next idea seemed obvious. “As a mohel I knew exactly what would be needed in a book on Milah.”

Rabbi Krohn tells of the favorable impression ArtScroll made on him. “Rabbi Nosson Scherman took his little phone book out from his inner jacket pocket and wrote my name and phone number in it. He pocketed the book, saying, ‘Now you’re one of us.’ I’ll never forget that.”

After Rabbi Krohn submittedwrote some sample chapters, ArtScroll accepted the concept and a contract was signed. But instead of a deadline, Rabbi Krohn was given a goal. “They told me, ‘Write a book on bris milah that is so thorough and so good, nobody will even consider writing another one for at least ten years.’” Thirty months later, Rabbi Krohn felt he had achieved that goal, and Bris Milah/Circumcision, was published.

Ready for his next writing challenge, Rabbi Krohn was inspired by short stories. His personal connection with Rav Sholom Schwadron, the Maggid of Yerushalayim, gave him the idea for his second book. Rabbi Krohn approached Rav Sholom and asked for permission to trasncribe his stories in a book accessible to the English reader.

“I wrote up the stories, and my cousin translated them for Rav Sholom. Then the most amazing thing happened: Rav Sholom called me and said that he liked what I had done with the stories, but that in many of them I had gleaned a different lesson from the story than he had.

“That is why The Maggid Speaks uses a different typeface for the introduction and epilogue than it does for the story itself. The stories belong to Rav Sholom, but the lessons and introductions are mine. This format worked so well that I continued to use it for all of my subsequent books. A story is like manna; just as everyone tasted the manna according to what they enjoyed, everyone can read a story and enjoy it, but they can each learn different lessons from it.”

After The Maggid Speaks, Rabbi Krohn believed he had finished writing short stories, but Rabbi Scherman had other plans. “Rabbi Scherman said that he had just come from South Africa where he saw a rebbi teaching his class from my book. He told me, ‘If rebbeim are teaching from your book, you need to write more.’”

Just as Rabbi Krohn worried that he didn’t have enough material for another book of stories, another amazing thing happened. “Rabbi Boruch Grossman called and asked me to speak at the graduation of his high school for Russian boys. That was my first public-speaking engagement. Following that, Mrs. Shanni Perr asked me to come to Camp Bnos to speak on Shabbos.” After those events, Rabbi Krohn received calls from other camps, and it wasn’t long before he had speaking engagements every Shabbos. Next, Rabbi Hillel David’s rebbitzen  invited him to speak to a ladies’ group, and things snowballed from there.

Along with the speaking invitations came another benefit. “People began to realize that if I was writing stories, I probably wanted to hear stories as well. Acquaintances and strangers approached me to tell their stories – on a plane, while crossing the street, anywhere. And they still do.” Rabbi Krohn collected stories for his next book, Around the Maggid’s Table. “It was called Around the Maggid’s Table, because that’s how stories are gathered. Rav Sholom would tell some stories, and others around his table would tell others.

The third book no longer contained stories from Rav Sholom, but rather – stories that Rabbi Krohn himself had collected and compiled. The book is therefore called In the Footsteps of The Maggid.

The format of Rabbi Krohn’s latest release differs from that of his previous books. “When Zman magazine originally began publishing, the editor-in-chief, Rabbi Yaakov Astor, asked if I would be willing to have my speeches transcribed to create articles for the magazine. I agreed, and ever since the first issue, one of my speeches has been the leading article.” After 25-30 issues had been published, Rabbi Gedaliah Zlotowitz thought of publishing these articles in book form. They worked it out with Zman, and published Perspectives of the Maggid.

His latest book, The Maggid at the Podium, is the second compilation of his speeches. “I knew that books of stories sell well, but I was amazed by the reception to this book.” Rabbi Krohn commented. The Maggid at the Podium sold over 5000 copies in its first couple of weeks, and “The feedback from readers has been wonderful, Boruch Hashem. People enjoy stories, but with this book, they get the lecture structure as well. There’s a buildup, development of the theme and a whole chapter for each topic.”

When asked if he prefers writing or speaking, Rabbi Krohn insists that he loves both, as each is uniquely rewarding. “But Bris Milah will always be first for me. It’s my main parnassah and a family tradition.” Both Rabbi Krohn’s father and grandfather were mohelim, and his son and son-in-law now continue the tradition.

Rabbi Krohn proudly recounts that his children are also continuing other family traditions. “My daughter Chaviva continued the writing tradition, first with stories from the Maggid books that she adapted for children.” Her newest children’s book, Making Hashem Proud is due out soon from ArtScroll. Rabbi Krohn’s daughter-in-law Genendel is achildren’s book author as well.” Speaking has also become a family tradition; Rabbi Krohn’s son Eliezer is a seminary teacher and popular speaker.

So much harbotzas Torah, such lofty legacies and traditions, one could wonder where they all comes from. But Rabbi Krohn sums it up simply. “Being a mohel is from my father, the writing is from my mother, and the speaking is from Rav Sholom Schwadron.”

Click here for exclusive online savings on Rabbi Krohn’s latest release: The Maggid at the Podium 

Click here for all titles by Rabbi Paysach Krohn

Kids Cooking Made Easy + Sample Recipes

Your kids will never be bored – or hungry! – again! Introducing Kids Cooking Made Easy – the latest in the popular Made Easy Cookbook series from the dynamic duo of Leah Schapira and Victoria Dwek.

Aimed at teaching children how to cook, the book is chock full of recipes that your kids will love – whether you cook it for them, or your kids cook it themselves! Kids Cooking Made Easy features 60 brand new recipes, each with a beautiful color photo, suggestions, and helpful tips. The innovative page layout of this book ensures that with each page, your children will become better cooks.

sample pages - Kids Cooking Made Easy

(Click here for larger images.)

To get you started, we are sharing two delicious recipes from Kids Cooking Made Easy. First, an easy weeknight supper that kids of all ages (and their parents too!) will enjoy.

bbq nuggets chicken nuggets - Kids Cooking Made Easy

Honey BBQ Chicken Nuggets:

Excerpted from Kids Cooking Made Easy, By Leah Schapira and Victoria Dwek. Published by Artscroll.

Yields: 4-6 servings

1½ lb    chicken cutlets, cut into nuggets

2 Tbsp    oil

6 Tbsp    honey

6 Tbsp    ketchup

1 tsp    yellow mustard

½ tsp    chili powder (optional)

1½-2 cups  panko crumbs

1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray.

2. In a small bowl, combine oil, honey, ketchup, mustard, and chili powder (optional). Use a spoon to stir the mixture until smooth. Pour half the sauce into a separate bowl to use as the dipping sauce; set aside.

3. Place panko crumbs into another bowl.

4. Dip chicken nuggets into the honey mixture and coat completely. Then, press into panko crumbs until chicken is fully coated on all sides.

5. Place chicken on prepared baking sheet. Spray the top of the nuggets with nonstick cooking spray. Bake for 25 minutes. For extra-crispy nuggets, turn the chicken halfway through the cooking time, baking for 12-13 minutes per side.

6. Serve with dipping sauce that you set aside in step 2.

Next, every kid’s favorite food – now in soup form!

pizza soup - Kids Cooking Made EasyPizza Soup:

Excerpted from Kids Cooking Made Easy, By Leah Schapira and Victoria Dwek. Published by Artscroll.

Yield: 4-6 servings

2 Tbsp   oil or butter

1   small onion, diced

1   garlic clove, minced

1   (28-oz) can crushed tomatoes

1 tsp   sugar

1 tsp   salt

1 tsp   dried basil

1 tsp   garlic powder

2 cups   milk

¼ cup   water

½ cup   shredded cheese, plus more for garnish, optional

  1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Using a wooden spoon, sauté until onion is soft, 5-7 minutes.
  2. Add crushed tomatoes and cook for 8-10 minutes. Add sugar, salt, basil, garlic powder, milk, and water and stir to combine. Cook for an additional 5 minutes.
  3. Add cheese. Stir until cheese is melted. Ladle soup into bowls to serve.
  4. Garnish with additional shredded cheese (optional).­­

Click here for book details, additional sample pages, and exclusive online savings.

Click here for other books in the Made Easy cookbook series.

Introducing: The Schottenstein Edition Mishnah Elucidated

Over the years, here at the ArtScroll office, we have learned a lot about Torah publishing. And a lot about people.

One of the truths we’ve learned is that different people have different needs, backgrounds and abilities. As part of our mission of bringing the eternal words of Torah to the English-speaking public, we realize the importance of providing Torah classics in various formats and levels, so that every individual can achieve the most when learning.  Thus, a quick glance at our catalog will show five different types of Siddurim, available in more than thirty different formats! That’s because we know that people have many needs – and we are determined to be there for everyone.

It is for this reason that we warmly welcome ArtScroll’s newest major project:

The Schottenstein Edition of the Mishnah Elucidated and its inaugural volume, containing mesechtos Taanis, Megillah, Beitzah,  Chagigah, Moed Katan, and Rosh Hashanah.

The Schottenstein Edition of The Mishnah Elucidated will do for the Mishnah what the universally acclaimed Schottenstein Edition of the Talmud does for the Gemara.

The new, elucidated Translation, based on the classic interpretation of Rabbeinu Ovadiah of Bertenoro (“the Rav”), adds words and phrases to make the Mishnah text read smoothly and clearly, without reference to the notes. This is ideal for those looking for a basic approach to the Mishnah – for example, people studying for a yahrtzeit or sheloshim and young people or adults who do not have extensive experience in Mishnah study. The Notes clarify the Mishnah further and draw, where necessary, on the Gemara or other classic Mishnah commentaries.

Just as people can choose which ArtScroll siddur best meets their needs, so too, now there is a choice in Mishnah study. The widely acclaimed 44-volume Mishnah Series with the Yad Avraham commentary, dedicated by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Glick, in memory of their son Avraham Yosef a”h is an encyclopedic, in-depth commentary that presents many explanations, explores nuances and complexities,  and cites a wide variety of works on the Mishnah, enabling students of Mishnah to  delve more deeply and explore a wider range of comments.

With the introduction of the Schottenstein Edition Elucidated Mishnayos and the recently completed Yad Avraham Mishnah Series, the Mishnah — the basis of Torah she’baal peh, the place where the Oral Law begins – is now accessible to everyone.

For concise Mishnah study, click here for exclusive online savings on the Schottenstein Edition of the Mishnah Elucidated.

For in-depth Mishnah study, click here for the entire Yad Avraham Mishna Series.

NEW Release: My Father, My Mother and Me by Yehudis Samet + Story Excerpt

After learning about the important Mitzvah of Kibud Av V’eim, honoring one’s parents, throughout our school years, we all grow up. As we get older and start our own families, our parents grow older too, and this mitzvah changes drastically from the one we learned about in school.

Many adults struggle with this mitzvah, as life’s changes bring along questions in dealing with elderly parents, parents-in-law and stepparents. Rebbetzin Yehudis Samet, best selling author of The Other Side of the Story, set out to clarify these questions, first in lectures all over the world, and now in this groundbreaking book: My Father, My Mother, and MeThe book features over 200 true stories of devotion, challenges, and success in this important commandment. It also features halacha, practical advice, and other inspiration.

We’ve chosen a sample story to share with you. It’s an inspirational tale of how a woman fully devoted 24 hours to her elderly mother, thus saving her endless pain and suffering – not to mention fear.

Excerpted from My Father, My Mother, and Me:

Dr. Glendall’s expression was impassive. “We’ll just have to open it up again and hope it heals correctly this time.” My mother squeezed my hand as he told a nurse, “Get Mrs. Ellis settled in pre-op.”

“But there are no beds, doctor. We’re full right now. Overfull, in fact. There won’t be an opening till,” she flipped through some papers, “tomorrow afternoon, at two-thirty.”

“Fine. It can wait till then.” The doctor turned back to my mother. “We’ll see you tomorrow afternoon, Mrs. Ellis. Arrive an hour early for admission.” As he swung around to leave the room, I slipped my hand out of my mother’s and raced after him.

“Dr. Glendall, isn’t there anything that can be done to avoid surgery?”

He shook his head as he hurried down the hall. “If a scar heals from the outside in, it must be reopened. Right now, toxic pus is seeping into your mother’s body, filling her with infection. It has to be let out.”

“But is there any way to do that without operating?”

We’d arrived at the elevators. He turned to face me. I guess he was evaluating the type of explanation an 18-year-old required. “Once a scar heals, only surgery can open it,” he said and then added, “Maybe if it was soaked in hot water for twenty-four hours it would open — but that’s, of course, not feasible.”

The elevator arrived and he stepped inside. “Surgery is the only option,” he told me as the doors closed. I quickly turned and raced back to the room where my mother sat waiting.

“What happened?” she asked, her face drawn from pain and fear.

“I just wanted to ask him if there was any other option. And, baruch Hashem, there’s hope,” I told her.

Dr. Glendall may have brushed off the soaking option, but I wasn’t going to let my mother go into another surgery without doing everything I could to prevent it. Not after everything she had been through. And definitely not given how much she feared going under the knife.She has good reason for her fears, I mused as we rode back to the small apartment in Queens she’d moved into after my father’s death. The past decade had been one long trauma of surgical errors and surgeries to fix those errors. Each time my mother entered the hospital, she was paralyzed with fear.

When we arrived home, I set to work. “Come lay on your bed, Mommy, where you’ll be comfortable,” I said, helping her into her room. I raced to the kitchen to prepare some boiling water. Then I gathered towels and set myself up at my mother’s side.The afternoon faded into the night, a long, blurry stretch of constant motion.

Soaking the wound was tedious work. I would take each towel from the pot of hot water, squeeze it out, wait till it had cooled a little before laying it carefully on my mother. Then I would place another towel in the pot so it would be ready when I needed it, and turn back to the current compress, running to the kitchen every now and then to heat more water.

With every compress, I davened that Hashem bless my efforts with success. Dip, squeeze, soak…dip, squeeze, soak, run and make food for Mommy…dip, squeeze, soak, boil more water…dip, squeeze, soak, Mommy’s thirsty, bring a drink of water…dip,squeeze, soak…

Fatigue was not long in coming. My back ached from bending over to hold the compresses in position and keep watch on the temperature, the muscles in my arms screamed in protest as I carried yet another pot heavy with hot water, and my eyelids drooped, begging for sleep. But I pushed myself to keep going.

And I didn’t stop, not when the first pastels of dawn appeared across the sky, not when the sounds of honking cars and city bustle flitted in through the window — I couldn’t stop, I wouldn’t stop, I would do everything I could to spare my mother from this dreaded surgery.

And finally, just as afternoon began, the scar opened. I wept as the wound began to drain.

“It worked, Mommy!” I cried. “It opened!”

My mother struggled to sit up, and we embraced, our tears mingling — tears of relief and gratitude that she would not need another operation, topped by my gratitude to the One Above Who helped me give my mother twenty-four hours of non-stop care, commitment, and love.

Click here for book details, more sample pages, and exclusive online savings.

Click here for all books by Yehudis Samet.

Motivating Force (Book Excerpt)

 In Living Life to its Fullest, Mr. Shulman, a popular speaker, author and life coach, offers us short, insightful and readable vignettes, each designed to provoke conversation and thought. Below is an excerpt about lessons in life’s motivations.

Motivating Force: 

Excerpted from Living Life to its Fullest by Avi Shulman

Ask a group of employers, “How do you motivate your employees?” and before you can finish your question you’ll hear almost all respond, “More money!”

Of course, if a family doesn’t have money to pay for essentials — food, rent, clothing, etc. — paying employees more money will surely motivate them in the short run.

But our question goes beyond the essentials. How do you keep an employee happy, working to his or her full capacity, and remaining in your company? And when we find the answer to this question, can we apply the same findings to motivating students and family members?

Every year a noted management-consulting firm conducts a survey of 200 companies on what motivates their staff. Managers and supervisors are given a list of 10 possible things that most motivated their employees. Here is the list in no particular order:

Job security; good wages; promotion opportunities; appreciation; good working conditions; loyalty from management; feeling “in” on things; understanding attitude; tactful discipline; interesting work.

In almost every response the supervisors thought that what matters most to the employees are the following, in order of importance:

  • Good wages
  • Job security
  • Promotion opportunities
  • Good working conditions
  • Interesting work
  • Loyalty from management
  • Tactful discipline
  • Appreciation
  • Understanding attitude
  • Feeling “in” on things

In almost every case, here is how the employees ranked what was really important to them:

  • Appreciation
  • Feeling “in” on things
  • Understanding attitude
  • Job security
  • Good wages
  • Interesting work
  • Promotion opportunities
  • Loyalty from management
  • Good work conditions
  • Tactful discipline

There are two interesting lessons to be learned from this study.

1. The three top motivators from the employee’s perspective — appreciation, feeling “in” on things, and understanding attitude — do not cost anything in terms of money, just a few moments of time, respect, and understanding.

2. Most of us see things only from our own perspective. You would think that supervisors and managers who work so closely with employees would know what motivates employees… but the truth is, they don’t know.

The lesson here is to realize that just because we know someone well or work with them does not mean we know what motivates them. Considerable thought, investigation, and discussion are necessary to learn what really motivates someone.

Click here for book details and exclusive online savings.

Click here for more books by Avi Shulman.

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NEW: The Wisdom in the Hebrew Months, Volume 2

“In The Wisdom in the Hebrew Months, Volume 2, R’ Zvi Ryzman takes sometimes esoteric and even mystical teachings and grounds them securely into our own lives.”

I am reading The Wisdom in the Hebrew Months, Volume 2, by R’ Zvi Ryzman, and I am deeply moved and profoundly impressed.

I chose, a bit childishly I admit, to begin with the month of Tammuz – my birthday month. And in these pages I discovered such a richness of Torah thought, so many unexpected connections, hints, and insights, it took my breath away.

Here I discovered the paradox of the month of Tammuz, and the essence of the month as reflected in the unique physical features of its constellation, the Crab. I learned how in Tammuz we journey from the perfection of Gan Eden to our own imperfect world, and back again.  Good and evil, failure and renewal, Jewish history and Jewish destiny – so many concepts and ideas, all brilliantly and lucidly explained.

R’ Zvi Ryzman, author of the highly-acclaimed The Wisdom in the Hebrew Months has followed up that brilliant work with this new, highly original volume. The author, like his books, is unique. He is a winner of the coveted Jerusalem Prize for his many volumes of the Hebrew Ratz K’tzvi , which the two volumes of  The Wisdom in the Hebrew Months are based upon. He is an authority on rarely explored halachic subjects, and his contagious love of learning sweeps up everyone with whom he comes in contact. He is also a well-known figure in business circles, and a supporter of many Torah institutions; the personification of the concept of “Torah v’gedulah,” Torah and business success.

In both his books, R’ Zvi draws upon a veritable constellation of sources: from Sefer Yetzirah (whose authorship is ascribed to Avrohom Avinu) and the Midrash to contemporary gedolim – and hundreds of sefarim in between. He explores the Hebrew months — and the constellations that both reflect and influence them — as well as the connection between the shevatim and the Jewish calendar.  And then he takes these sometimes esoteric and even mystical teachings and grounds them securely into our own lives and actions. Fascinating!

A  personal confession: What with the stifling heat of the Tammuz summer, the 17th of Tammuz that begins the Three Weeks, and the rather unpleasant connotations of crabs (!)  I never liked my birth month. But now, having seen it through the eyes of Chazal and Torah, through the eyes, yes, of emes, I will not only mark my birthday, but I will celebrate my birth month, with all its complexity and grandeur.

Click here for more details on the book, and a special online discount.